Thanks in part to Soulforce, BYU changes honor code about gay students

Three weeks after an on-campus visit from Soulforce during their second annual Equality Ride, Brigham Young University has tweaked its honor code statement about homosexuality. Certainly this change doesn’t change the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormons) into an open-arms community for LGBT people, but it’s a positive step.

I can’t imagine how bad it would be to be a sexual minority kid growing up Mormon, especially in  Salt Lake City.

I knew a man in the 1970s who was gay; he had been a grad student at BYU, and had gotten kicked out when he was discovered to be queer. At that time, he was very close to completing his Ph.D., but–because it was an honor code violation–they refused to credential the coursework that he had completed, so he couldn’t transfer any of his credits to another school. Having moved out of the area (and having my own life trauma at the time, the result of my own coming out), I lost touch with him, but I believe that he never completed his doctorate.

So I hope that this action on the part of BYU will mean that this never happens to another student. And that it’s a step on the road, not  the end of their progress there.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

BYU changes honor code text about gay students
It now says stated orientation is not an issue and clarifies which actions are violations

By Julia Lyon
The Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake Tribune
4/17/2007

What a difference just a few sentences can make.

A small but significant change in how Brigham Young University’s honor code may be applied clarifies gay students’ status just weeks after gay-rights advocates were arrested at the school.

The changes, which condemn behavior rather than sexual orientation, “remove a lot of the Gestapo atmosphere from the campus,” said Brett Condron, a BYU freshman.

The new section of the honor code application reads, in part: “Brigham Young University will respond to homosexual behavior rather than to feelings or orientation and welcomes as full members of the university community all whose behavior meets university standards… One’s stated sexual orientation is not an Honor Code issue. However, the Honor Code requires all members of the university community to manifest a strict commitment to the law of chastity.”

The honor code is a set of rules students and staff at the school owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are expected to follow in order to live the “moral virtues encompassed in the gospel of Jesus Christ.” The honor code’s applications clarify the short set of rules. Students who disregard the code can be put on probation and, in rare situations, suspended.

Prior to the honor code application change, the section on homosexual behavior or advocacy read, in part: “Brigham Young University will respond to student behavior rather than to feelings or orientation… Advocacy of a homosexual lifestyle (whether implied or explicit) or any behaviors that indicate homosexual conduct, including those not sexual in nature, are inappropriate and violate the Honor Code.”

That version had too many holes leading to individual interpretation, students said.

In March, a mother and son from Kanab were cited with trespassing after trying to deliver a list of concerns from former and current gay BYU students about their treatment at the school. Their actions followed the arrest last year of 29 members of Soulforce Equality Riders, the group that also organized this year’s event.

BYU spokeswoman Carri Jenkins said the revision is not related to Soulforce. Instead, it reflects the school’s response to student questions and concerns.

“I think what it does, it better explains our position,” she said.

Such changes occur on an ongoing basis. On Monday, students praised the administration’s willingness to listen.

“With the previous honor code there was a lot of fear attached to it,” said David Hulet, a senior. “[Now] we have clarity and understanding of what is acceptable and what isn’t.”

A former BYU student who is now an attorney in Seattle, Nick Literski was among bloggers buzzing about the news. Literski, a gay man who has withdrawn his membership from the church, said his daughter will attend the school this fall.

“What it’s reflecting is there’s a growing disconnect between church position on homosexuality versus what individual members are coming to see,” he said in a phone interview.

“As more and more members of the LDS Church are coming to know individuals who are gay and finding out that they’re human, that these are people just like them, that they’re good people, it becomes difficult for them to demonize homosexuality the way the church positions do.”

* JULIA LYON can be contacted at jlyon@sltrib.com or 801-257-8748.

Brigham Young University will respond to student behavior rather than to feelings or orientation.
Students can be enrolled at the University and remain in good Honor Code standing if they maintain a current ecclesiastical endorsement and conduct their lives in a manner consistent with gospel principles and the Honor Code. Advocacy of a homosexual lifestyle (whether implied or explicit) or any behaviors that indicate homosexual conduct, including those not sexual in nature, are inappropriate and violate the Honor Code.

New statement:

Brigham Young University will respond to homosexual behavior rather than to feelings or orientation and welcomes as full members of the university community all whose behavior meets university standards. Members of the university community can remain in good Honor Code standing if they conduct their lives in a manner consistent with gospel principles and the Honor Code.

One’s stated sexual orientation is not an Honor Code issue. However, the Honor Code requires all members of the university community to manifest a strict commitment to the law of chastity. Homosexual behavior or advocacy of homosexual behavior are inappropriate and violate the Honor Code. Homosexual behavior includes not only sexual relations between members of the same sex, but all forms of physical intimacy that give expression to homosexual feelings. Advocacy includes seeking to influence others to engage in homosexual behavior or promoting homosexual relations as being morally acceptable.

http://www.sltrib.com/news/ci_5684555

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: gay, GLBT, LDS, lesbian, LGBT

One Comment on “Thanks in part to Soulforce, BYU changes honor code about gay students”

  1. Hidden Says:

    “I can’t imagine how bad it would be to be a sexual minority kid growing up Mormon, especially in Salt Lake City.”

    Piece of my mind,

    That’s me. 100% I was one of the driving forces behind the change also. If you are serious about understanding what’s it’s like to grow up Mormon and gay, I’m more than willing to give my perspective.

    I can’t speak for everyone or give a blanket stereotype of what’s it’s like, but I can share myself.

    Please contact me if you’re interested in pursuing this understanding.

    ~Hidden
    theDOThiddenDOTgayATgmailDOTcom


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: